SHARE

jasper hamill

Apple iPhone beaten by £12.99 BBC Micro:Bit in computer performance 'race'
Gadgets were put through their paces by calculating the Fibonacci sequence (Picture: Geoff Robinson Photography)

The iPhone is generally considered to be a marvel of modern engineering – and comes with a price tag to match.

So you may be surprised to hear that an Apple smartphone was beaten in a ‘race’ between eight computers from the last 75 years to see which was the fastest.

Man who forced teen to rape boy, 4, and girl to eat dog food is jailed for 32 years

The iPhone, using Siri voice commands and answers to demonstrate advances in computing, came second to last in the race, which saw a variety of machines spanning eight decades of computing battle to see which could output most numbers in the Fibonacci sequence in 15 seconds.

The iPhone, using Siri voice commands and answers to demonstrate advances in computing, came second to last in the race, which saw the machine, spanning eight decades of computing, programmed and raced to see which could output most numbers in the Fibonacci sequence in 15 seconds.

The £12.99 BBC Micro:Bit from 2015 came out top scoring an incredible 8843, the PC with Windows 98 came next with 1477, a BBC Micro from 1981 came third with 70.

Apple iPhone beaten by £12.99 BBC Micro:Bit in computer performance 'race'
The test took place at the National Museum of Computing (Picture: Geoff Robinson Photography)

Fourth place went to an Apple II from 1977, which scored 35, whilst the PDP-8 from 1965 came fifth with 16, the Facit calculator came sixth with seven, the iPhone came seventh with four and the 1951 WITCH came last with three.

The race honoured Fibonacci, the twelfth-century Italian mathematician regarded as the most talented Western mathematician of the Middle Ages, by generating numbers in the Fibonacci sequence.

That sequence starts with 0 and 1 and progresses by adding the two numbers preceding it in a sequence which begins with ‘0 1 1 2 3 5 8 13 21’.

More: UK

Kevin Murrell, trustee of The National Museum of Computing and the Grand Digital race starter, said: ‘This is the first time that machines from so many decades of computing have raced together.

‘I suspect this was the first of many Grand Digitals as we have many other original working computers, skilfully restored by our Museum volunteers, that could enter the race to demonstrate the advance of computing.’

Original Article

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here