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Cannes has long been the stomping ground for the rich and famous especially during its annual international film festival, which is now approaching its 73rd year.

Aside from the glitz, glamour, parties, red carpets and the luxurious shopping outlets, there is much more to experience in this resort town on the French Riviera.

A trip to Cannes can be a gateway to other nearby hidden gems as I discovered during my weekend getaway. My first port of call was to head to the Quai Laubeuf Pier where I hopped on board a ferry to the Lérins Islands, a group of four Mediterranean islands off the coast of the Côte dAzur.

My destination is Saint-Honorat, an offshore island that has been inhabited by a small community of Cistercian monks since the 5th century. The exclusive sanctuary is only accessible by a ferry based service operated by local residents.

The Lerins Islands provide an escape from the hustle and bustle of Cannes

The Lerins Islands provide an escape from the hustle and bustle of Cannes (Picture: See Cannes)

As we set sail we leave behind the Bay of Cannes and head into the turquoise hues of the Mediterranean Sea. The 15 minute journey is picture-perfect – we drift across the sun-drenched ocean while passing by million-pound yachts anchoring away from the island coast.

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Upon disembarking the ferry we made our way towards what seemed to be a secluded natural oasis. Other than the sounds of our feet treading on stones it was a tranquillity of silence. Fellow visitors nod and speak in small whispers as they pass each other by.

While I was eager to spot a monk, there werent any in sight, which in the end was ok as its easy to go on your own voyage of discovery on these holy grounds. Except for the monastery, where the monks live, visitors have free roaming rights with no distractions to all of Saint-Honorats winding paths, luscious green natural coves and hidden beaches.

Saint Honorat is an offshore island home to a small community of Cistercian monks

Saint Honorat is an offshore island home to a small community of Cistercian monks (Picture: See Cannes)

The 10th century Gothic style chapel is tucked away on the site but its doors are always open for both the curious and those who seek solitude. The chapels tour is self-contained with welcome booklets providing the historical background on the compound and the monks.

In the distance of the chapel looms the fortified monastery of Lerins Abbey, which was by far my favourite part, as it looks like its been taken right out of an episode of Game of Thrones. This open-aired 11th-century ruin is very much intact, offers shade from the sun and you can hike to the top of the structure, where youll be greeted with a 360° panoramic view of Saint-Honorat.

Another real dime to experience on the island is the monasterys wine tasting tour, which may sound like a joke. But the local monks at Saint-Honorat are traditionally winemakers and have been vinifying on the island since the middle ages.

The Lerins Abbey Monastery fortress dates back to the 11th century

The Lerins Abbey Monastery fortress dates back to the 11th century (Picture: Stephanie Takyi)

Currently, the monks are producing some of the regions finest wine and liqueurs, with some dating back 150 years. I had more insight into their production as we met our tour guide Esmeralda on the eight-hectare wine estate.

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During the wine tasting session there was tipple for every taste bud, the full-bodied 2014 Saint-Honorat Shiraz followed by the crispy and fruity Chardonnay Grande Cuvée. Needless to say I left the island feeling relaxed and a tad bit merry.

Cannes started to smell much sweeter as I headed to the Fragonard Parfumeur La Fabrique des Fleurs factory in Grasse. Located in the hills, north of Cannes, the area is known for its long-established perfume industry and is popular with both locals and enthusiasts.

Once inside, guests can have a guided tour in English to see how the factory creates its perfumes. I had the chance to put my senses to work as I concocted my own sweet smell of success.

Visitors to Saint-Honorat can sign themselves up for a wine tasting tour at the monastery

Visitors to Saint-Honorat can sign themselves up for a wine tasting tour at the monastery (Picture: Stephanie Takyi)

After a busy morning it was back to the decadence of Cannes, where all the action seemed to be taking place in the Boulevard de la Croisette. Also known as the jewel of Cannes it curves along the coast and is lined with sandy beaches, upmarket boutiques and palatial hotels.

To escape the glamorous mayhem I head to Palais Stéphanie, the biggest private beach club on the French Riviera. Hidden away from the crowds I found myself lounging on a sunbed facing the view of the Mediterranean Sea while the resident DJ played sun-kissed grooves

With food and cocktails being delivered to my sunbed, I didnt move for hours. It was the perfect spot to relax and watch the sun go down on Cannes.

The Boulevard de la Croisette is also known as the jewel of Cannes and lines the town's infamous sandy coastline

The Boulevard de la Croisette is also known as the jewel of Cannes and lines the towns infamous sandy coastline (Picture: Getty)

Having reached my zen level requirement for the day it was tempting to head back to my hotel and sleep but that would have been boring as Cannes has a sophisticated nightlife.

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The town comes into swing as a party destination from August with events such as Les Plages Electroniques, transforming the city into a clubbing hotspot.

Each year over 36,000 festival-goers attend this music festival – with parties taking place on the shores of the Mediterranean Sea, the Beach, the Terrace, and of course, the Croisette. All the venues pave the way and become the stomping grounds for the best DJs and performers in the electronic scene.

Previous years have seen headline acts such as Major Lazer, DJ Snake and Kygo leave their mark in Les Plages Électroniques hall of fame. Consider yourself lucky if you get to experience this famous French gathering.

Cannes is also home to the Les Plages Electroniques music festival which takes place every August

Cannes is also home to the Les Plages Electroniques music festival which takes place every August (Picture: Alexandre Macchi)

The festival sprawls across various venues in Cannes including the Beach, the Terrace and the Croisette

The festival sprawls across various venues in Cannes including the Beach, the Terrace and the Croisette (Picture: Robin Baird)

No trip to Cannes is complete without a culinary adventure at one its many esteemed eateries. Like most places in France alfresco dining is heavily a part of the food culture of the Cote dAzur.

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I went for lunch at La Sousta, which is beautifully positioned at the feet of Le Suquet, Cannes Old Town, on Rue du Pre. In this part of Cannes you can get an authentic and less commercialised glimpse of the traditional Provençal lifestyle.

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The owner, Philippe, was welcoming and friendly and did his best to explain and make recommendations from the menu, which is only in French.

Charming and medieval Le Suquet is home to steep cobbled alley

Charming and medieval Le Suquet is home to steep cobbled alleys (Picture: Stephanie Takyi)

Cannes old town is called Le Suquet and offers visitors a chance to experience a traditional part of the town

Cannes old town is called Le Suquet and offers visitors a chance to experience a traditional part of the town (Picture: See Cannes)

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